New FASoS T&L blog on using writing in PBL

One problem of PBL is that only one student can speak at once. And the competition to seize the floor favours the most confident. FASoS Academic Writing Advisor John Harbord discusses how using writing in PBL can change that dynamic, allowing greater participation, giving shy students the chance to articulate and share their thoughts, and feeding a multiplicity of ideas into the discussion.

The typical PBL session: some students talk, some are silent – are the silent ones not contributing because they didn’t do the reading, because they are shy, or why? One problem of PBL is that only one student can speak at once. And the competition to seize the floor favours the most confident. FASoS Academic Writing Advisor John Harbord discusses how using writing in PBL can change that dynamic, allowing greater participation, giving shy students the chance to articulate and share their thoughts, and feeding a multiplicity of ideas into the discussion. Additionally, students practice drafting coherent written arguments, and come away with a permanent record of their thoughts.

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