Poetry Contest

The poetry keeps coming… the talent in the faculty is amazing. People are writing poems for the first time, in other languages. Please keep sending them to Sally Wyatt.

When this is over, we will prepare a booklet of everything we have received, with a special section for the limericks.

This week we present ‘I walked with a cat’ by Dora Vrhoci (CAST student).

I Walked with a Cat

This year, April is indeed the cruelest month.[1]

The virus keeps us apart; it separates.

 

I hear the mellow melody of the bluebird; it resonates.

I hear it as I walk along the streets of Heer.

 

A cat suddenly appears; out of the blue.

“It’s Natsume Sōseki,” I thought,[2]

And make that funny sound all humans do

To make these mysterious, mischievous creatures

Stick around.

 

The cat notices me; it sticks around.

It joins me on my evening walk.

 

And so we walk,

Together,

We walk along the streets of Heer.

 

“The streets are eerily quiet,” I thought,

“Except for me and the cat.”

“They’re afraid of the virus,” I thought,

“Except for me and the fearless cat.”

“We’re lawbreakers,” I thought,

“We walk less than a meter apart.”

 

An old lady suddenly appears.

She walks our way.

 

The cat and I move to the right.

The old lady moves to the right.

The cat and I move to the left.

The old lady moves to the left.

The old lady moves to the right.

The cat and I remain on the left.

 

She gives us a smile,

We give her a smile.

She makes a remark in Dutch.

We give her another smile,

And walk for another mile.

We didn’t understand too much.

 

“Perhaps there’s some hope for April,” I thought,

And continue to walk along the streets of Heer.

 

And so does the cat,

As brown as a bear.

 

[1] The first verse is a reference to T. S. Eliot’s poem The Waste Land (1922). Eliot’s poem starts with the verse “April is the cruelest month, breeding.”

[2] Natsume Sōseki (1867-1916) was a Japanese novelist. One of his famous novels is called I Am a Cat (1906). Sōseki is often portrayed as a cat in Japanese popular culture.

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